Tag Archives: painter

Muzzle of a Bull.

22 Jul
Muzzle of a Bull, watercolor 1523

Muzzle of a Bull, watercolor 1523

From renaissance onwards a new mentality arises in the field of observation. Drawings become more realistic, perspective and mathematics gain in importance. Albrecht Dürer is considered one of the first landscape artists. His series of observations, true to nature with the sharpest details, were never intended as artwork but rather as mere studies of nature. Self-conscious as Dürer was, taking into account his large collection of self portraits, he signed all of his works with his remarkable signature. As a painter, printmaker, theoretician and would-be reformer of the arts, his inexhaustible collection of works make him one of history’s greatest European visual artists.

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The Flemish Primitives: Closer to Van Eyck.

28 Mar
The Ghent Altarpiece, detail of Eve by Jan Van Eyck.

The Ghent Altarpiece, detail of Eve by Jan Van Eyck.

The Flemish Primitives refer to the work of artists active in the Low Countries during the 15th and 16th century Northern Renaissance, especially in the flourishing Burgundian cities of Tournai, Bruges, Ghent and Brussels. Jan van Eyck brings on a revolution in the history of painting between 1420 and 1441. His work makes end to the refined ‘international style’ that dominates the art at the time. His precise observation and naturalistic rendering of reality, his brilliant colouring and the oil technique that he perfectly masters gives him the look of a virtuosity. As a court painter of the Burgundian dukes, he moves within the highest circles. The Ghent Altarpiece, was initiated by his brother. However in 1432, after the death of his brother, Van Eyck finishes the work. The urgent conservation treatment of the Ghent Altarpiece in the Saint Bavo Cathedral in Ghent was finalised in October 2010. It provided a unique opportunity to thoroughly document Van Eyck’s use of materials and his painting technique, and to record the state of conservation. The results are made available to the public through the website ‘Closer to Van Eyck’.

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