Tag Archives: sculptures

Gothic Naturalism by Claus Sluter.

14 Mar

Detail of Angel Claus Sluter

Claus Sluter was the most famous sculptor of his days (1340-1405) and a key figure in the school of Gothic Art. Sluter’s sculptures are naturalistic and expressive, and more earthly bound than idealistic. He restored the monumental scale and naturalism of the classical era. His later work is highly emotional, using facial expressions, figural stance, and drapery. This can be particularly seen in the heavy folds of cloth that so many later imitators draped around their figures. His style of naturalism went on to influence a generation of realist Renaissance painters like Jan van Eyck, Roger Van der Weyden, Matthias Grunewald and Albrecht Durer. Sluter’s most famous surviving work is the Well of Moses to be visited in Dijon, France. It shows strongly individualized figures of Moses, David, and the Prophets. A masterpiece of dignity and power.

claus-sluter-well-of-moses-prophets-david-and-jeremiah-1

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Eve’s Apple.

11 Mar

Romaans sculptuur op kapiteel Eva & Apple

Romanesque Art refers to the art of Europe from 1000 AD onwards. With the fall of the Roman Empire, the tradition of sculpting figures in stone and bronze died out, as it did in the Byzantine world, for religious reasons . The growth of Romanesque art was stimulated intensely by the circulation of pilgrims and by travelling craftsmen and artists, who moved from one construction yard to another to offer their services. Most Romanesque sculptures are pictorial and biblical in subject. A great variety of themes are found on capitals. The ‘Temptation of Eve’ from Gislebertus was created around the 1130s. Eve lays in a sensual pose, keeping her face away from the sin she will commit. She hold the hand with the apple, subject of the Fall, on her back. On the right we notice the Tree of Knowledge of good and evil. Satan, here symbolized as the snake, only shows his tale as he is leaving quickly after tempting Eve with the forbidden fruit.

Kouros, symbol of youth.

24 Feb

anavyss

The kouros is one of the earliest freestanding marble statues from around the 7th century BC. It demonstrates the interest that ancient Greeks had in the male form and is a symbol of youth. It would be used as a tomb stone or as a dedication in the sanctuary of a god. The features are very distinctive: the smile, the outspoken musculature, the rigid posture, the hands closed in fists and the left leg slightly standing forward. The kouros served as an inspiration for Yves Saint Laurent, who launched a very masculine fragrance under the name Kouros, in 1981. The advertisements, still now, totally embody the ancient features and represent strong and attractive young men.

The Thinker.

20 Feb

3CycladicThinkerStatue

Is Rodin your only reference to ‘The thinker’? Think again. Between 3200 and 2000 B.C. the small Cycladic islands in the Aegean sea became home to a flourishing culture. The most prominent craft was stone-cutting, especially marble sculptures. There was an abundance of high quality, white marble of which small figurines were made. The majority of them show women, nude with the arms folded over the belly. It is not known why these figurines were very popular, they probably symbolized a form of worshiping.

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